Skip to main content

Full text of "Lone Star masonry cement."

See other formats


It 




11 






[BLANK PAGE] 





INTFRNATIONAl 



s 



* 











..- . 














EFUL INFORMATION FOR ARCHITECTS, ENGINEERS AND MASONRY CONTRACTORS 






QUALITY AND ECONOMY: Produced to exacting standards, under 
rigid laboratory control at every stage of manufacture, Lone Star 
Masonry Cement greatly simplifies the problem of obtaining uni- 
formly high-quality mortar. One ready-to-use cementing material 



THE $9.5-MILLION, 10 story 500-bed 
Veterans Administration Hospital, New 
Orleans, in which 5,293 barrels of 
Lone Star Masonry Cement were used 
in laying up all brick, block and stone 
— typical of the widespread use of this 
high-quality mortar cement in large- 
scale construction. 



instead of two means one less variable in proportioning, and one 



less material to handle on the job. No addition of lime or Portland 
Cement is necessary — soaking or slaking is eliminated. Economy, 
coupled with durable, weather-resistant performance, explains 
the widespread use of Lone Star Masonry Cement for all kinds of 
masonry work, on structures large and small. 



JAYHAWK JUNIOR MOTEL, attractive. 

ranch-type structure, operated by the 
owners of The Jayhawk, Topeka's lead- 
ing hotel — pleasing example of attrac- 
tive, durable masonry construction with 
Lone Star Masonry Cement in all types 
ol walls — brick, stone, concrete block, 
tile, glass block, stucco. 




i 







THE ECONOMIC VALUE 



OF GOOD MASONRY CEMENT 



• Good design, good workmanship and good 
materials are the requisites of quality masonry 



construction. Other things being equal, the 
quality of the mortar is a decisive factor in as- 
suring durable, weathertight masonry of last- 
ing beauty. 

Attractive, durable structures the country 
over show that for many years quality mor- 
tars have been obtained with mixes of Port- 
land cement and lime. This reflects seasoned 
experience at the mixing box and craftsman- 
ship on the scaffold. 

But it is equally true that the quality of 
cement-lime mortar varies with the quality of 
the materials used and with the degree of 
skill and experience that go into the propor- 



tioning and mixing with water of three differ- 
ent materials-Portland cement, lime and sand. 

This emphasizes an important advantage 
of Lone Star Masonry Cement, which 
only has to be mixed with sand and water. 
With one cementing material instead of two, 
there is one less variable in proportioning, 
which helps assure quality mortar of utmost 
uniformity. 

From the standpoint of labor costs, this 
factory-produced, ready-to-use masonry ce- 
ment means one less material to handle on the 
job. 

Paralleling a study of problems in the field 
with work in the cement laboratory, it has 
been possible to incorporate in Lone Star 
Masonry Cement the combination of prop- 





CHEMICAL SOUNDNESS is of utmost im- 

portance as a safeguard against ex- 
pansion. The autoclave test, part of 
regular quality control procedure in the 
manufacture of Lone Star Masonry 
Cement, reveals in a matter of hours 
any volume change due to chemical 
unsoundness that might only take place 
after years of exposure. 

Left, placing bars of Lone Star Ma- 
sonry Cement in the autoclave, where 
they are subjected for 3 hours to super- 
heated steam at a temperature of 420 
F. and a pressure of 310 psi. Right, 
measuring bars for expansion. 

Autoclave expansion of Lone Star 
Masonry Cement is always below 

0.5%, assuring the long-time soundness 
of mortar made with this cement. 



l 



erties desired by the Architect, the Mason and 
the Owner: 

1. High water retention, assuring excel- 
lent workability, plasticity and bond; 

2. Adequate strength; 

3. Soundness — no delayed expansion; 

4. Low absorption and high water repel- 
lency, an assurance of durability and 
a safeguard against unsightly efflores- 
cence; 

5. Low shrinkage. 

A Standard of Excellence 

Through outstanding performance, 
name Lone Star has become synonymous with 
high quality and uniformity in all types of 
Portland cements, and this family attribute 
applies to Lone Star Masonry Cement- 
the modern cement specially designed to pro- 



This booklet provides factual information 



duce quality mortar for laying up brick and 
block and for all purposes where lime-cement 
mortars have been used. 



Star 



Cement and places in the hands of the Archi- 
tect, Engineer and Mason convenient infor- 
mation which will be found an important aid 
to quality masonry construction. 





HIGH WATER RETENTION s essential for work- 

ability, plasticity and bond. This standard test 
for water retention simulates the sucking action 
brick or block. Suction is applied to mortar 
for one minute. The difference in the flow of the 
mortar, before and after the suction test, indi- 
cates the plasticity and water retention. Stand- 
ard mortar specifications require that the flow 
after suction be not less than 70% of the lie 
before suction is applied 



1 















. 






I M 






I 







ANALYSIS OF PROPERTIES 

ASSURING HIGHEST - QUALITY MASONRY MORTAR 




In a masonry mortar, the Architect is inter- 
ested in obtaining a watertight joint, good bond, 
low shrinkage and no expansion, in a mortar free 
from salts as protection against efflorescence. 

The Mason wants a plastic, workable mix that 
is buttery and smooth-spreading — with good yield 
and minimum droppage, one that assures eco- 
nomical, high-speed performance. 

The Owner wants a watertight and an attrac- 
tive wall that resists moisture penetration. 

The properties built into Lone Star Masonry 
Cement provide the strongest possible assurance 
of satistaetion in meeting all these requirements 

A.S.T.M. Specification C 91 and Federal Speci- 
fication SS-C-1KI set minimum requirements for 

masonry cements — Type I intended foi mortal 

above grade and not exposed to frost action, and 
Type II tor general use in masonry construction. 



even under the severest exposure conditions. 

In each specification the requirements for Type 
I and Type II are identical except for strength. 
When tested in accordance with the specifications 
the strength must be as follows: 



Age 


Compressive Strength 
minimum psi 


Type I 


Type II 


7 days 
28 days 


250 

500 


500 
i 1000 



Lone Star Masonry Cement at all times ex- 
ceeds the requirements of the Type II Specifics 
tion, and hence automatically exceeds all require 

ments for Type I 

The specifications also cover such normal Port 
land cement properties as fineness, setting (niu 



strength, soundness and air entrainment. 



well 




THROUGHOUT THE MANUFACTURING PROCESS, continuous samples 

are taken from the mill stream for test. Pari of this system of rigid 
quality control is the standard test for strength. No shipment 
leaves a Lone Star mill unless it passes all standard tests and in 
addition meets our own self-imposed quality standards 




IN ADDITION to standard strength tests, the Lone Star Cement 
Research Laboratory conducts continuing studies of mortar prot 
erties including bond. The test lustrated above is part of the 
investigation of various factors such as consistency, mix propo 
tions and plasticity, as they affect bond. 






as water retention, absorption and water repel- 
lency, which properties apply specifically to ma- 
sonry cements. 



Lone Star Masonry Cement — What It /s 

Lone Star Masonry Cement consists of scien- 
tifically determined proportions of Portland ce- 
ment and limestone very finely inter-ground, with 
special plasticizing and air-entraining agents 
added during the grinding process. Accurate con- 
trol throughout manufacture assures a masonry 
cement of highest quality, uniform from batch to 
batch and job to job. 



Plasticity and Workability 

Plasticity and workability are essential in as- 
suring quality and economy in masonry work and 
play an important part in the strength, appear- 
ance and resistance to the passage of water in the 
finished work. 



It is for this reason that Lone Star Masonry 
Cement is specifically formulated to impart extra 
smoothness and workability to the mortar. Lone 
Star Masonry Cement mortars have a plasticity 
which is in every way comparable to that of the 
best cement-lime putty mixes. 

Lone Star Masonry Cement produces an 
extra-fat mortar that spreads easily into long mor- 
tar beds, works smoothly under the trowel, with 
maximum speed and minimum effort. A bag of 
Lone Star Masonry Cement (70 lbs., or 1 cu. ft.) 
will readily carry three full cubic feet of sand, in 
a mortar which makes it easy to shove brick or 
block accurately into place, assuring neat, eco- 
nomical work. 



Water Retention 

Masonry mortar is used with units having a 
wide range of suction; some are very porous, 
with high absorption, while others are relatively 
impervious. The ability of a mortar to prevent 






^ 



i 

• 



£> 
C* 

k 
& 



$ 



90 



SO 



70 



60 




Mortar Mix by Yo/ume 



Fig. I: EFFECT OF MIX PROPORTIONS ON WATER RETENTION. Each 

water retention value represents an average of 10 tests with Lone 
Star Masonry Cement (2 samples each from 5 Lone Star mills), in 
mortars with commercial sand. All mortars were made to the same 
consistency — 110% flow on standard flow table. As the graph 
shows, the richer the mix. the better its water retention. Note high 
water retention ol the recommended 1:3 mix, but even the lean 
15 mix had better than 70% water retention, indicating the high 
•and-carrying capacity of Lone Star Masonry Cement, 



90 



keo 




§ 



^70 



fc 




GO 









— — ^ 


^_^_ 






"~en 


_—— 










ySy 


y 










h^.^6 



























































































0/23 456789/0// 

Mixing Time- Minutes 



Fig 2: EFFECT OF MIXING TIME ON WATER RETENTION. Water t- 

tention was determined on the recommended mix of one part Lone 
Star Masonry Cement to 3 parts sand by volume, with mixing 
time of mortar batches ranging from l /z minute to 10 minutes. Each 
value represents an average of 5 tests. Water retention and plas- 
ticity improved rapidly during the first 2 minutes ol mixing, reach- 
ing a maximum after about 4 minutes. These tests show the im- 
portance of thorough mixing in obtaining mortar of maximum plas- 
ticity Thorough mixing also improves yield 



rapid loss of water to highly absorptive units and 
prevent bleeding when used with impervious units 
is one of the most important properties of a good 
masonry mortar. Because it affects the bond be- 
tween mortar and masonry units, water retention 
has an important effect upon watertightness and 
durability. 

Lone Star Masonry mortars have unusually 
high water-retaining capacity; hence, the mortar 
remains plastic, so brick or block can be properly 
bedded and good bond obtained. 

Fig. 1 shows how water retention and plasticity 
are affected by mix proportions. The recom- 
mended 1:3 mix has excellent water retention. 

Fig. 2 shows the effect of mixing time upon 
water retention and plasticity. 

Thorough mixing is necessary to fully develop 
the plastic properties of any mortar. In these tests, 
mixing beyond three minutes produced no addi- 
tional benefit, while mixing less than one minute 



resulted in a mortar very deficient in water re- 



tention. 



Adhesion and Bond 

Permanent bond is of course the primary requi- 
site in a strong, watertight wall, and Lone Star 
Masonry Cement contributes importantly to this 
end. 

Hardening is timed to permit deep penetration 
and keying into the porous structure of brick or 
block. Exceptional constancy of volume means 
that the bond, once formed, is of maximum dura- 
bility. 



Strength 

The strength of Lone Star Masonry Cement is 
at all times above the specification limits for Type 
II masonry cement. The strength of mortar de- 
pends upon mix proportions and the amount of 
water used per bag of cement. 



5 2500 









? 

£ 






2000 



1500 



^ 1000 



500 








1:2 13 f-'4 

Mortar Mix by fa fume 



IS 






• 






1 



2500 r 



2000 



1500 



1000 



500 








3 



4 



5 



6 



7 



8 



Wafer - Gal. per 70 /b. bag Mssonry Cement 






Fig. 3: EFFECT OF MIX PROPORTIONS ON STRENGTH OF MORTAR. 

Compression tests of 2" mortar cubes, moist cured for 7 days, 
then in air, with Lone Star Masonry mortar mixes of 1:2 to 1:5 by 
volume. Commercial masonry sand was used in mortars. Each 
value represents an average of 30 tests. The strength of a mortar 
depends on mix proportions or cement content. The 1:2 mix had a 
28-day compressive strength of about 2500 psi, as compared to 
approximately 450 psi for the 1:5 mix. Careful proportioning is 
necessary to obtain uniform results. 



Fig. 4: EFFECT OF WATER CONTENT ON STRENGTH OF MORTAR. The 

amount of water used per bag of Masonry Cement determines the 
strength of the mortar. Typical relations between strengths and 
water per bag cement are shown in Fig. 4, with each value repre- 
senting average of 30 tests. The richer mixes are stronger because 
they require less water per bag of cement. 

Water requirements for the 5 mixes tested were as follows: 

Mix by volume 1:2 1:2% 1:3 1:4 1:5 

Water gal./bag 3.7 4.1 4.6 5.6 6.7 



Fig. 3 shows the effect of mix proportions on 
strength, at 3, 7 and 28 days. Fig. 4 gives typical 



strength relation. It will be 



water cement ratio- 
noted that, depending upon mix proportions, 28- 
day strengths ranging from 500 to 2500 psi can 
be obtained. 

The strength of a 1:3 Lone Star Masonry mor- 
tar is more than adequate for general masonry 
construction — foundations, load-bearing and 
parapet walls, or for stacks — without the fur- 
ther addition of Portland cement or admixture of 
any kind. 



Durability 

Durability is of special importance in provid- 
ing long-time protection against exposure to the 
elements. Lone Star Masonry Cement produces a 
durable mortar. Its air-entraining properties as- 
sure high resistance to alternate freezing and 
thawin 

Inherent water repellency and low absorption 
characteristics prevent joints from becoming sat- 
urated, protecting against destructive weathering 
action. 

With Lone Star Masonrv Cement, no addi- 
tional waterproofing material is necessary. The 



chemical soundness of this cement is a safeguard 
against expansion of mortar joints. 

Walls built with Lone Star Masonry Cement 
mortar are strong and durable, providing sound 
protection against the costly expense of repoint- 
ing, and retain their attractive appearance 
through the years. 

Fig. 5 shows results of standard absorption 
tests on mortar mixes ranging from 1:2 to 1:5. 
These tests show that absorption of Lone Star 
Masonry mortars is very low after submersion in 
water, which indicates high resistance to moisture 
penetration. 

Non-Efflorescent 

Efflorescence can only occur when soluble salts 
are present in the materials used in masonry work, 
and water in sufficient quantity is present to carry 
the salts to the surface, where they are deposited 
upon evaporation of the water. 

Lone Star Masonry Cement, being practically 
free from salts, is not a factor in efflorescence. 
Moreover, low water absorption and high water 
repellency of this mortar serve to restrain the 
leaching out of any salts that may be present in 
the sand or brick. 

Thus, while it cannot be said that the use of 





TWO TYPES OF TESTS are used 1o check for i jrescence. In a 
test suggested by the Public Housing Authority (illustrated at 
left) brick known to be free of salts are placed in pulverized 
mortar mixed with an excess ol distilled water and carefully 
observed for appearance of efflorescence 

In the test, illustrated al right, two bricks separated by a 
mortar )oint ol Lone Star Masonry mortar were placed in a 



solution of 5% sodium carbonate, to check the effectiveness of 
the mortar joint as a barrier against passage of salts from brick 
to brick Brick in this test had an absorption of 21% Even 
though the joints were not tooled, the mortar joinl effectively 
barred the passage of moisture and prevented the spread of 
efflorescence 









Lone Star Masonry Cement is a guarantee against 
efflorescence, it can be said that its use is a big 
factor in minimizing the possibility of this ex- 
pensive annoyance. 



Co/or 

Rigid control during the manufacture of Lone 
Star Masonry Cement assures a uniform, pleasing 
color. In this connection, it should be borne in 
mind that the color of masonry mortar will vary 
with the color of the sand used. 

Special color effects can be obtained by the 
addition of high-grade, lime-fast, mineral-oxide 
pigments. The low water absorption and density 
of Lone Star Masonry mortars help retain the 
desired color effect. 



ing of sand by weight is an aid to uniform quality 
and maintained yield throughout the job, because 
variations in moisture content have considerably 
less effect than variations in volume due to 
bulking. 



Sand 

Aggregate for masonry mortar consists of nat- 
ural sand or manufactured sand. Some sands are 
better suited than others. The use of clean, well- 
graded sand makes it possible to take full ad- 
vantage of the properties of Lone Star Masonry 
Cement. 

To assure economical masonry work of high 
quality, sand should comply with the require- 
ments of A.S.T.M. Specification C 144, the prin- 
cipal provisions of which are as follows: 



Proportioning 

The amount of sand per bag of cement affects 
the quality of the mortar. The relationship be- 
tween mix proportions, strength and water reten- 
tion is shown in Figs. 1 and 3. 

The recommended proportion of one bag ( 1 
cu. ft.) of Lone Star Masonry Cement to 3 cu. ft. 
of sand will produce a mortar of excellent work- 
ability and adequate strength. However, it may 
be necessary to adjust these proportions to take 
care of variations in sand and brick. Proportion- 



10 



8 






S 2 





ffef. Absorption Test of 2-/n. cubes 



Grading 

Percent Passing 

Sieve Size Natural Sand Manufactured Sand 

No. 4 100 100 

No. 8 95 to 100 95 to 100 

No. 16 60 to 100 60 to 100 

No. 30 35 to 70 35 to 70 

No. 50 15 to 35 20 to 40 

No. 100 2 to 15 10 to 25 

No. 200 0to 10 

Deleterious substances shall not exceed the fol- 
lowing amounts: 

Maximum Permissible 
Item Percentage by Weight 

Clay lumps 1.0 

Lightweight particles, floating on 
liquid having a specific gravity 
of 2.0 0.5 

Organic materials shall not be present in 
injurious amounts. When sand is tested for organic 



/■2 1:3 /'4 tS 

Morfer Mix fry Volume 



Fig. 5: EFFECT OF MIX PROPORTIONS ON ABSORPTION. Two-inch 

cubes, made in accordance with Federal Specifications SS- 
C-181, were cured moist for 7 days, then oven dried for 24 
hours. After cooling, they were weighed and immersed in l A" 
of water, then re-weighed after 1 hour and 24 hours immersion 
and absorption determined. Each value shown is an average 
of 30 tests. Low absorption gives a good indication of the 
ability of a mortar to resist the weathering action of the ele- 
ments. Absorption increases as the mix becomes leaner. 



7 



impurities and produces a color darker than the 
standard it shall be rejected. 



exact proportions and assure uniform and con- 
stant yield throughout the job. 



Water 

Any water fit to drink can be used in mixing 
the mortar. Use of alkaline waters or the addi- 
tion of salts may cause efflorescence. The amount 
of water should of course be varied according 
to the type of brick used. At all times, use enough 
water to produce a workable mortar of the proper 
cohesiveness and spreading quality. 



Mixing 

In hand mixing, the first step is to mix the 
cement and the sand until the mixture has a uni- 
form color. Then slowly add water, and hoe from 
end to end of the mortar box, until a workable 
consistency is obtained. 

In machine mixing, pour about one-half of the 
total mixing water into the mixer, then follow 
with the sand and cement. Add enough water to 
provide the required consistency. 

Mix the entire batch for from two to four min- 
utes. Thorough mixing is necessary to obtain 
maximum workability and yield and to assure a 
uniformly colored batch. 



Yield 

Lone Star Masonry Cement has a high sand- 

arrying capacity. For a given mix proportion. 

the Meld of mortar per bag of cement depend 
upon the characteristics of the sand and thor- 
lighness of nming. When a satisiactory mix i 
obtained, measure the sand accurately to maintain 



LOW ABSORPTION is essentia] as an assurance against 
weathering action The absorption of hardened mortar is de- 
termined in accordance with Federal Specification SS-C-181. 
Cubes cne placed in a drying oven at a temperature of 220 
F. for 20 to 24 hours and then weighed The cubes are then 
placed in water for one hour and for 24 hours. After removal, 
they are again weighed to determine absorption, providing 
a good indication of the ability of the mortar to keep out 
moisture 



Reminders 

In hot, dry or windy weather, when mortar 
tends to dry out. keep the mortar covered as much 
as possible; dampen highly absorptive units before 



use. 



In cold weather, protect the work against 
freezing until mortar is properly hardened. Units 
should be free from frost. Maintain the tempera- 
ture of water and sand at about 70 degrees. 

One final point: It takes first-class workman- 
ship, along with good design and good materials, 
to produce sound, weather-proof masonry work. 
Most masons are highly skilled and have a keen 
sense of pride in their craft, and the special prop- 
erties of Lone Star Masonry Cement assure them 
of a mortar which makes possible quality work 
with efficient job speed. 




i 










PERFORMANCE 

of lone Star Masonry Cement 

Covers the Entire Range of Masonry Work 



• Representative of the wide use of Lone Star Masonry Cement for clean, strong, 
weathertight walls in structures of all types are the attractive, well-designed buildings 
shown on this and following pages. This all-purpose mortar cement fits the most exact- 
ing requirements of the entire range of masonry work. 





IN THE PHYSICS LABORATORY (below) of Sylvania Electric 
Products, Inc., Bayside, L. I., glazed-brick walls pleasantly 
punctuated by clean-cut joints clearly speak of the artisan 
working with quality materials. Public appreciation of this 
handsome building was expressed by a Prize Award for ex- 
cellence in design and construction. Illustrating widespread 
repeated use based on satisfaction of Owner, Architect and 
Contractor, Lone Star Masonry Cement was later used on 
Sylvania's new Metallurgy Laboratories Building, shown 





IlKS'l rJU/l MHAKD 

fef Mil 

jpHAMIM'K O) U)MM1 W3 
tOHOUUH t)l C}\>llN:. 

NI.W YORK. i.I'lY 



SYIVAN1A 
t M 'IKK I'KCDAK IS INC 

,,) i xi I Ml W I IN IrtSM.M ANI» 

i ihi:. UUtlUNC. 

1 ill' '* •'•■> 



ATTRACTIVE, WEATHERTIGHT WALLS laid up with 

Lone Star Masonry Cement enhance the appearance 
of many well-built structures across the country, 
among them being staunchly constructed Hotel 
Borger, in Borger, Texas, embodying the utmost in 
fire-saiety through the use of Lone Star Portland 
Cement in its reinforced concrete frame — highest 
standard of cement quality from foundation to roof. 







i 





i 






NEARLY 60 FEET IN HEIGHT, 81 Drive In Theatre, on U. S Highway 81 
North Broadway, Wichita, is one of the tallest concrete masonry rue 
tures of its type in Kansas. Sixty thousand concrete block, made with 
Lone Star Air-Entraining Cement, were laid up with Lone Star Masonry 
Ceme mortar, and the end result of good design, efficient workman- 
and quality cement is an unusually attractive structure of maxi- 
mum v y and economy 









DRIVE I 
THEATRE 





n 




1 1 



HOLDS ITS TEMPER uk 



e no- 



body's business/' said the 
Masons who used Lone Star 
Masonry Cement mortar on 
well-designed Sacred Heart 
School and Gymnasium, Yon- 
kers, N. Y. "No chopping and 
retempering on the board — 
works faster and easier — 
sticks to brick or block like a 
true friend — easier to tool, 
makes a neater job." In addi- 
tion to exterior brick walls. 
Lone Star Masonry mortar 
was also used in exposed 
cinder-block walls in class- 
rooms and corridors and for 
interior tile work as well. 








THAT THE PEOPLE of Abilene. 
Texas, refer to the Radford Memo- 
rial Student Life Center at Mc- 
Murry College as the "McMurry 
Masterpiece" is a tribute not alone 
to the excellence of its architec- 
tural design but to the attractive, 
expertly-handled brickwork as 
well. "This mortar really does 
spread like butter," said the Ma- 
sons, in referring to the perform- 
ance of Lone Star Masonry Ce- 
ment on this outstanding building 



11 




EASIEST WORKING MORTAR a man ever put a trowel to, 
said the Masons on Sam Houston Elementary School, 
Odessa, Texas, the quality of whose work is evidenced by 
attractive brick walls, with the clean, smooth mortar joints 
which are always the mark of Lone Star Masonry mortar in 
the hands of the skilled craftsman. 












HANDSOME FACE-BRICK WALLS laid 

up with Lone Star Masonry Mortar 
lend distinction to the appearance 
of the 120-bed addition to Beth-El 
Hospital, Brooklyn. N. Y. f now one 
of the largest voluntary hospitals in 
the U S. Typical of the many struc- 
tures in which this uniformly high- 
quality mortar has proved its worth, 
in extra workability, finer appear- 
ance, and maintenance-free service 
over the years. 



i: 








EAST INDIANOLA SCHOOL, North Topeka, Kansas, is anolher uli 



with Lone Star Masonry Cement mortar — Lone Slcr Portland 
Cement in foundation, frame, pilasters, roof slab and cast-in 
place decorative motifs 



THE TRIM, PLEASING, WELL-BUILT 

appearance of the First Federal 
Savings & Loan Building, Lubbock, 
Texas, suggests friendly, up-to-date 
banking service. To achieve its 
clean, straight simplicity of line, a 
pleasing combination of Roman 
brick and white cast-stone, laid up 
with Lone Star Masonry mortar, was 
used to excellent effect. 




13 





with quality the sole arbiter, and a principal concern is to keep 
out moisture. With this in mind, Lone Star Masonry Cement was 
used in laying up all brick and block on the New York Telephone 
Company Building, at West New Brighton, Staten Island. During 
cold weather, 'Incor' 24-Hour Cement was used in concreting the 
frame; elsewhere, in foundations, frame, floors and roof, Lone 
Star Portland Cement was used. There is a Lone Star Cement for 



every construction need 



uring a single standard of highest 



quality throughout the building 




M 



YOU SURE CAN PUT 'EM TO BED 



with this mortar/' said the Masons 



who laid up the eye-pleasing 



work on the Hotel Lincoln, Odessa, 
Texas, in commenting on the perform- 
ance of Lone Star Masonry Cement — 
the all-purpose mortar cement which 
makes it easier for the Mason to build 
attractive, weathertight walls — the 
primary aim and interest of every 
Architect, Contractor and Mason. 



14 




REFERENCE TABLES for Estimating Quantities 



Table 1: BRICK AND MORTAR FOR 100 SQUARE 


FEET 


OF 


SOLID BRICK WALL 






JOINT THICKNESS 




Va" 


'/•" 


%" 


¥•" 


4-INCH WALL 


Bricks— No. 




698 


655 


616 


581 


Mortar — Cu. Ft. 




4.0 


5.7 


7.2 


8.6 


Cu. Yd. 




.148 


.211 


,267 


.318 


*Wl.— 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Lb. 




33.6 


34.0 


34.2 


34.6 




8-INCH WALL 






Brick*— No. 




1396 


1310 


1232 


1161 


Mortar — Cu. Ft. 




12.2 


15.5 


18.6 


21.3 


Cu. Yd. 




.452 


.574 


.689 


.788 


*Wt.— 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Lb. 




72.6 


73.2 


73.9 


74.3 




12 -INCH WALL 






Brick*— No. 




2095 


1965 


1848 


1742 


Mortar — Cu. Ft. 




20.3 


25.3 


29.9 


34.0 


Cu. Yd. 




.752 


.937 


1.11 


1.26 


*Wt.— 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Lb. 




111.4 


112.4 


113.4 


114.1 




16-INCH WALL 






Bricks — No. 




2793 


2620 


2464 


2322 


Mortar — Cu. Ft. 




28.5 


35.1 


41.4 


46,7 


Cu. Yd. 




1.06 


1.30 


1.53 


1.73 


*Wt.— 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Lb. 




150.T 


151.0 


152.9 


153.9 



Quantities are net — Allow for waste. 
♦Approximate wt. wail = No. Bricks x 4.1 lb. -f Cu. Ft. Mortar x 125 lb 
Common brick 2'/ 4 " x 3 J / 4 " x 3", All joints filled. 



Table II: BLOCK AND MORTAR FOR 

OF BLOCK WALL 


100 SQUARE FEET 




MATERIALS 


CONCRETE 


BLOCK — Height x Length 




7*/i"xl5VB" 


5"x1 1 *A" 


3 s /*"xl5Vs" 




4-INCH WALL 








Blocks — No. 
Mortar— Cu. Ft. 
Cu. Yd. 
*Wt. 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Heavy Agt. 
— Lbs. — Light Agt. 


112.5 

2.3 

.085 

28.5 

20.5 


220 

3.6 

.133 

30.0 

21.5 


225 

3.9 

.144 

30.5 

21.5 




6-INCH WALL 








Blocks — No. 
Mortar— Cu. Ft. 
Cu. Yd. 
*Wt. 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Heavy Agt. 
—Lbs. —Light Agt. 


112.5 
2.3 

.085 
43.5 
29.5 


220 

3.6 

.133 

45.0 
30.5 


225 
3.9 

.144 
45.5 
30.5 




8-INCH WALL 








Blocks — No. 
Mortar — Cu. Ft. 
Cu. Yd. 
*Wt. 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Heavy Agt. 
— lbs. — Light Agt. 


112.5 

2.3 

.085 

55.0 

36.0 


220 

3.6 

.133 

56.5 

37.0 


225 
3.9 

.144 
57.0 
37.0 




12-INCH WALL 








Blocks — No. 
Mortar — Cu. Ft. 
Cu. Yd. 
*Wt. 1 Sq. Ft. Wall— Heavy Agt. 
—Lbs. —Light Agt. 


112.5 

2.3 

.085 

79.5 

49.0 


— 


— 





Quantities are net — Allow for waste. 

Data based on Vs-inch mortar joint, with face-shell bedding. 
*Approx. wt. of wall = actual wt. single unit x no, units -f 1 25 x cu. ft. 
mortar. 

Actual wt. of wall with heavy agt. block usually within ±7% table value. 
Actual wt. of wall with light agt. block usually within ±17% table value. 



Table III; QUANTITIES FOR 100 SQUARE FEET COMPOSITE WALL 



BLOCK, 



BRICK 



AND 



MORTAR 



Number of Stretcher Block 



Number of Header Block 



Number of Brick 



Mortar* Cu. Ft. 

Cu. Yd, 



8-in. wall 




7th course 
bonding 



97 



t* 



(4x 8 x 16 1 



772 



11.2 
.407 



WALL DETAIL AND 



ATE Rl A LS 



12-in. wall 




7th course 
bonding 



97 



• * 



(8 x 8 x 16 ) 



868 



12.2 
,452 



12-in. wall 




6th course 

bonding 



57 

(8 t 8 x 16") 



57 



•* 



(8 x 8 x 16 ) 



788 



12.2 
.452 



♦Mortar quantities based on %-in. joints with face-shell bedding for the block. Quantities are n^t. Allow for waste. 



8~in wall 







7th course 
bonding 



193 

(4 x 5 x 12") 



770 



11.8 
.438 





Table IV: 1:3 MORTAR— QUANTITIES FOR 1000 BRICK— Size 2'/ 4 


x 33/ 4 x 8 


in. 


Sand Lb 


./Cu. Ft. 


80 


85 


90 


95 


Joint 


Mortar 
Cu. Ft. 


Cement 
Bags 


Sand 
Cu. Yd. 


Cement 
Bags 


Sand 
Cu. Yd. 


Cement 
Bags 


Sand 
Cu. Yd. 


Cement 

Bags 


Sand 
Cu. Yd. 






4-INCH WALL 








Vi" 


5.7 

9.0 

11.7 

14.8 


1.9 
3.0 
3.9 
4.9 


.21 
.33 

.43 
.55 


1.8 
2.8 
3.7 
4.7 


.20 
.32 
.41 
.52 


1.7 
2.7 
3.5 
4.4 


.19 
.30 
.39 
.49 


1.6 
2.6 
3.3 
4.2 


.18 
.28 
.37 
.47 






8-INCH WALL 










8.7 

11.7 
15.1 

18.3 


2.9 

1 3.9 

5.0 

6.1 


.32 
.43 
.56 
.68 


2.7 
3.7 
4.8 

5.8 


.31 
.41 
,53 
.64 


2.6 
3.5 
4.5 
5.5 


.29 
.39 
.50 
.61 


2.5 
3.3 
4.3 
5.2 


27 
.37 
.48 

.58 






12-INCH WALL 










9.7 

13.0 
16.3 

19.6 


3.2 
4.3 
5.4 
6.5 


.36 
.48 
.60 
.73 


3.1 
4.1 
5.1 
6.2 


.34 
.46 
.57 
.69 


2.9 

3.9 
4.9 
5.9 


.32 
.43 

| .54 
.65 


2.8 
3.7 
4.7 
5.6 


.31 
.41 
.51 
.62 






16-INCH WALL 








V4" 

Vi" 

V2" 
5 / 8 " 


10.2 
13.4 
16.8 
20.1 


3.4 

4.5 
5.6 

6.7 


.38 
.50 
.62 
.74 


3,2 

4.2 

5.3 

1 6.3 


.36 
.47 

.59 
.71 


3.1 
4.0 
5.0 
6.0 


.34 
.45 
.56 
.67 


2.9 
3.8 

4.8 
5.7 


.32 
.42 
,53 
.63 


Unit 

HxL 


MORTAR QUANTITIES FOR 100 BLOCK 






8x16 

5x12 

| 4x16 


2.1 
1.5 
1.6 


.70 

.50 

.53 




.078 
.056 
.059 


.66 
.47 

.50 


.074 
.053 
.056 


.63 
.45 

.48 


.070 
.050 
.053 


.60 
.43 

.46 


.066 
.047 

.050 



I 



Quantities are net — Allow for waste. 

Brick data based on common brick, all walls solid with full bed and head joints. Block data based on Ve-in. mortar joints 



Table V: LONE STAR MASONRY CEMENT AND SAND FOR ONE CUBIC YARD OF MORTAR 




MIX, by volume 


1:2 


1:2 y 2 


1:3 


1:3Y 2 


1:4 


1:5 


Sand at 80 lb. per cu. ft.* 


Cement, bags 
Sand, co. yds. 
Mortar, cu. ft. /bag 


12.8 

.94 

2.11 


10.6 

,98 

2.55 


9.0 

1.0 

3.00 


7.9 
1.01 
3.42 


6.8 
1.02 
397 


5.6 
1.03 
4.82 






Sand at 85 lb. per cu. ft. 








Cement, bogs 
Sand, cu. yds. 
Mortar, cu. ft. /bag 


12.2 

.90 

2.21 


10.0 

.93 
2.70 


8.5 

.95 

3.17 


7.4 

.96 
3 65 


6.5 

.96 
4.15 


5.4 

.97 

5.00 






Sand at 90 lb. per cu. ft. 








Cement, bags 
Sand, cu. yds. 
Mortar, cu. ft. /bag 


11.6 

.86 

2.32 


9.5 
.88 

2.84 


8.1 

.90 

3.33 


7.0 

.90 
3.86 


6.2 

.91 
4.35 


5.0 
.92 
5.4 






Sand at 95 lb. per cu. ft. 








Cement, bags 
Sand, cu. yds. 
Mortar, cu. ft. /bag 


11.1 

.82 
2.43 


9.1 

.84 

I 2.97 


7.7 
.85 

3.51 


6.6 

.86 
4.09 


5.9 
.87 

4.58 


4.8 

.88 

5.62 



Sand varies in weight. Table is based on 4 conditions assuming that 1 cu. ft. of damp loose sand contains 80, 85, 90 and 95 lbs. of dry sand and 1 bog 
of Lone Star Masonry cement equals 1 cu. ft, weighing 70 lbs. 

♦This weight is used in standard mortar tests — ASTM specification C270. 







Table VI: 


LONE STAR MASONRY CEMENT STUCCO: 


Materials per 


100 sq. ft. 






Thick- 
ness 
in. 


Morlar 

; cu. ft. 






MASONRY CEMENT — Sand 


Mixes by Loose 


Volumes* 








1:2 


1:2 1/ 2 


1:3 


1 :3 '/j 


Lone Star 

Masonry 
bogs 




Masonry 
Sand ! 
cu. ft. 


Lone Star 

Masonry 

bags 


Masonry 
Sand 
cu. ft. 


Lone Star 

Masonry 

bags 


Masonry 
Sand 
cu. ft. 


Lone Star 

Masonry 

bags 


Masonry 
Sand 
cu. ft. 


V4 

v. 

1 1 


2.08 

3.12 

4.17 

5.21 

6.25 

8.33 


0.98 

1.47 

1.97 
2.46 
2.95 
3.93 


1.96 

2.95 
3.94 
4.92 

5 90 

7.87 


0.81 
1.22 
1.63 
2.04 
2.45 
3.26 


2.04 
3.05 
4.08 
5.10 
6.12 
8.15 


0.69 
1.04 
1.39 
1.74 
2.09 
2.78 




2.08 
3.12 

4.18 
5.22 
6.26 
8.34 


0.61 
0.92 
1.23 
1.53 
1.84 
2,45 


2.10 

3.15 

4.21 

5.25 

6.30 

8.40 


Quantiti 


es are net— allow 


v for waste. 





















♦Table bosed upon 1 cu. ft. of damp loose sand containing 80 lbs. of dry sand. 



TRULY, A MASON'S MORTAR 



• In the final analysis, quality work depends upon skill at the mixing box and crafts- 
manship on the scaffold — and no craftsman takes greater pride in the quality of his 
workmanship than does the Mason. 

By facilitating the work of the skilled Mason every step of the way. Lone Star Masonry 
Cement helps assure quality work with efficient job speed: 




EXTRA SMOOTH, WORKABLE MORTAR: 

One cementing material instead of two 
means one less variable in proportion- 
ing, assuring plastic, workable mortar 
of utmost uniformity. 




LONG, PLASTIC MORTAR BEDS: Masons can 
place and bed more brick or block in a given 
time . . . smooth-running work schedules, higher 
production without hustle. 




MORTAR STAYS PLASTIC, so brick or 
block can be properly bedded, with 
good, full joints that are so important 
in strong, durable work. 



SAVES TIME AND LABOR ON THE JOB: 

Sticks to brick or block with minimum 
droppage . . . high water retention 
means less retempering. 



MORE TIME BEFORE STRIKING: Makes it easy to 
go header high before striking joints — tho 




clean, smooth, watertight joints that are the 
good mason's hallmark. 



ALL-PURPOSE MORTAR: For plaster and 
stucco, too, this highly workable mor- 
tar works like butter under the trowel, 
clings to brick, block or tile, forms 
dense, water-repellent coat. 





Well-established Building Material Dealers supply LONE STAR MASONRY CEMENT 
as well as LONE STAR PORTLAND CEMENT, LONE STAR AIR-ENTRAINING CEMENT and 'INCOR'S 24-HOUR CEMENT 

... a Lone Star Cement for Every Construction Need. 



Printed in U.S.A. 



M— 11-52 












ONE STAR CEMENTS 



COVER THE ENTIRE 



ONSTRUCTION FIELD 



£ 






L 



OM~.Atll.ENC. tM. • IIIMI. N. t. • NNUNI, M. . BIRMINGHAM - BOSTON . CHICAGO • ALIAS . HOUSTON . INOIANAPOLI S 



KANSAS CITT. MO • NEW ORLEANS - NEW YORK • NORFOLK . RHUADLLPMIA . RICHMOND • ST. LOUIS • WASHINGTON. 0. C 










I